Which Sentence Has A Subject-Verb Agreement Error

Sometimes the verb passes in front of the subject. However, the same rules still apply to the agreement: the simple theme of the sentence is “everyone”, so the predicate must be singular instead of the plural. In this sentence, “Each student” is the theme, so we need a unique predicate. The only choice of answers that contains a single predicate for the subject “Each of the students” is “Each of the students was sick last week, so the professor canceled the conference.” The problem with the sentence as it is written is that the theme of the phrase, “every night,” is singular, but the verb “were” is plural. The subject and the verb must match. The correct answer is: “Every night for five straight nights was well below freezing.” In such cases, the verb is usually singular. On the other hand, if you reverse the sentence (which may seem more natural), then the verb becomes plural: there is however an exception to this rule. Sometimes a composite subject refers to only one thing, in which case it takes a singular verb: the stick decides how it wants to vote. Meticulous speakers and authors would avoid attributing the singular and plural they attribute to the stick in the same sentence. The underlined part of the sentence contains a verb error with “runs.” “John and Susan,” while the two singular nouns are together a plural and require a plural form instead of singular “races.” “Run to the finish line” is the right answer choice. Replace the highlighted part by selecting answers that results in a clear and accurate set that meets the requirements of standard policing English. Anyone who uses a plural verb with a collective noun must be careful to be precise – and also coherent. This should not be done lightly.

The following is the kind of erroneous phrase that one sees and hears these days: The theme of the sentence is singular, “the boy” and not the plural “many friends”, which means that the verb must also be singular. In addition, the sentence must keep the same meaning as it makes the celebration young. “Celebrating” is the right choice of response. Article 1. A theme will be in front of a sentence that will begin. It is a key rule for understanding the subjects. The word is the culprit in many, perhaps most, subject-word errors. Hasidic writers, speakers, readers and listeners might regret the all-too-frequent error in the following sentence: The word that there is a contraction of it leads to bad habits in informal sentences as there are many people here today, because it is easier to say “there is” than “there is.” It is recommended to rewrite these sentences whenever possible.

The previous sentence would be even better than Rule 10. The word has been replaced by phrases that express a wish or that go against the fact: the relative pronouns, those that, and that allow you to get additional information.